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Find Words in Filings

Usage
“Find” is used to search for words and numbers within the Documents of any subset of Filings you are looking at.  (“Find” only searches for text within the specific Documents you are looking at, so if you are really searching for something that is an “Entity” in a more global sense, such as a company or person, you should instead use the Search tab in the top menu of each page to Do an “Entity” Search.)  For “Find”, enter the words you are looking for, select the “Show” context display options you prefer, and then click on the “Find” button.  All text searches are case-insensitive, so capitalization is irrelevant.
Wildcards
The words you enter may contain the standard single- and multiple-character wildcard symbols:  a question mark (‘?’) will match 0 or 1 letter/digit, and an asterisk (‘*’) will match 0 or more letters/digits.  For example, M?cGroary will find both “McGroary” and “MacGroary”, and owner* will find all of “Owner”, “Owners”, “ownership”, etc.  (Wildcards are substitutes only for letters/digits, not punctuation.)
Logic
You may use logic operators for multiple-word searches, but you do not need to (and should not) use them unless you explicitly intend to override the default behavior for either the in-Document test for words or the context display of found words.  “Find” understands both standard logic operators: If you don’t use them, “Find” assumes “and” for the in-Document test and “or” (implying “anywhere”) for the context display.  Note that the defaults for the in-Document test and context display are opposite, resulting in the highlighting of each word found anywhere in Documents where all the words are present somewhere.  This results in the widest possible search within the Documents, in terms of the individual word “hits” displayed.  When you do use the logic operators, you override this default behavior for either the in-Document test or the context display, effectively narrowing your search.
Grouping
Quotation marks (double ‘"’), parentheses (‘(’ and ‘)’), angle brackets (‘<’ and ‘>’), square brackets (‘[’ and ‘]’) and curly brackets (‘{’ and ‘}’) can be used to group words that should be found only if they are near each other in the text.  If you use them, “Find” assumes “and” for both the in-Document test and the context display.  For the context display, an “and” implies “near” each other, while the default “or” implies “anywhere” in the text.  Double-quotes are useful around phrases and names when you want all of what’s quoted to be present.
Punctuation
For all other punctuation characters, such as hyphens and apostrophes, “Find” assumes “and” for both the in-Document test and the context display.  For example, O'Malley implies “O and Malley” for the in-Document test and “O near Malley” for the context display.
Precedence
“And” tests have higher precedence than “or” tests, so the “and” tests are performed before the “or” tests.  This standard behavior can be overridden by using grouping operators.  For example, "Bill | Will* Gates" will find “William near Gates” (due to the assumed “and” inside the quotes) or “Bill” (by itself, anywhere), while "(Bill | Will*) Gates" will find “Bill near Gates” or “William near Gates”.
Hyphenation
If you are not sure about hyphenations, you should do an “or” search for both hyphenated and non-hyphenated versions.  For example, "(anti-dilution | antidilution) protection".  (The question-mark wildcard cannot be used to deal with the hyphen in this situation, because wildcards are substitutes only for letters/digits, not punctuation.)
Apostrophes
Similar to hyphenation, do an “or” search.  For example, "(funds' | fund's) performance".